Shipping and Shipwrecks on the Great Lakes

Great Lakes Shipping Ports & Cargoes
By Patrick D. Lapinski
Iconografix 2009, 160 pages
$26.56 paperback

GLShippingPorts.jpg¶  On average, over 163 million net tons of cargo are moved each year on the Great Lakes in the holds of a vast fleet of steel ships. From the western end of Lake Superior to the shallow, emerald-colored waters of Lake Erie, ships arrive and depart at all hours amid a landscape of dirt-laden mill buildings, smoke streaked skies, and vast fields of coal and iron ore pellets. These images, contemporary and historic, take you to all of the primary loading and unloading ports from Lake Superior to Lake Erie. [Click on the book images to see details or to purchase on Amazon.com. We do not receive commission for book sales.]

Great Lakes Ore Docks and Ore Cars
By Patrick C. Dorin
Iconografix 2007, 128 pages
$19.97 paperback

GLOreDocks.jpgThe iron mining industry was quite extensive throughout the Lake Superior Iron Ore District, which included Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and other prominent iron mining regions to the northeast and east of Lake Superior in Ontario, Quebec, and Labrador. All of the iron ore was transported by rail to lake ports on Lakes Superior, Michigan, and Huron. This book lists all of the ore docks constructed on the Great Lakes. Each chapter includes the types of ore docks once or currently operated as well as a roster of ore cars from the 1940s to the present time, and includes photos of the ore docks and ore cars, ore car schematics and pertinent data.

Great Lake Shipwrecks (DVD)
Studio: Discovery Channel, 2007
$19.95 for DVD

GLShipwrecks-DiscoveryThunder Bay, in Lake Huron, is nicknamed “Shipwreck Alley.” It is home to more than 100 shipwrecks, some in waters as shallow as 15 feet. The wrecks include everything from wooden schooners to sidewheel steamers and modern freighters. Scientists wonder why this body of water is so dangerous. This one-hour special follows a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association deep-water expedition to shed light on the forces in Thunder Bay that are the catalysts for the wrecks.

Great Lakes Shipwrecks & Survivals
By William Ratigan
Eerdmans Publishing, 1960, 384 pages
$12.24 paperback

GLShipwrecksSurvivalsA look at some of the most spectacular shipwrecks and most incredible survivals in history. Ratigan recreates scenes of high courage and panic as he describes the three greatest killer storms in modern times, among others. Included are the magnificent excursion liner Eastland, which capsized at her pier in the Chicago River, drowning 835 people within clutching distance of busy downtown streets; the shipwrecked steel freighter Mataafa, which dumped its crew into freezing waters while the snowbound town of Duluth looked on; the dark Sunday in November 1913 when Lake Huron swallowed eight long ships without a single survivor (see White Hurricane, below); and the bitter November of 1958 when the Bradley went down in Lake Michigan during one of the greatest killer storms on the freshwater seas. An entire section is dedicated to the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald — the most famous maritime loss in modern times — in Lake Superior in 1975. The book features “chilling” watercolor illustrations, photographs, maps, and news clippings.

White Hurricane: A Great Lakes November Gale and America’s Deadliest Maritime Disaster
By David G. Brown
International Marine/Ragged Mountain Press, 2004, 256 pages
$17.95 paperback

WhiteHurricane“A riveting, well researched account of the worst Great Lakes storm on record” (Inland Seas, the journal of the Great Lakes Historical Society). On November 7, 1913, after four days of winds up to 90 mph, whiteout blizzard conditions, and mountainous seas, 19 ships had been lost on the Great Lakes, and 238 sailors were dead. Cleveland confronted the worst natural disaster in its history. David G. Brown combines narrative intensity with factual depth to create a vast epic ranging over Lakes Superior, Michigan, Huron, and Erie.

Mysteries and Histories: Shipwrecks of the Great Lakes
By Wes Oleszewski
Avery Color Studios, 1997, 295 pages
$16.95 paperback

MysteriesHistoriesNot reviewed. Be the first to write a review of this book: contact the editor, Dave Freedman.

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